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Re: interesting, wild plants

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 11:48 am
by marykays1
Thanks Keljonma!

that is so interesting...My 6 y.o. daughter did an experiment! When I was trimming up our Christmas tree, I let her smell the needles and she loved the smell, so cut up a bunch and put them in water to make "perfume." they're still sitting there...LOL, but I'm afraid to use as this was a tree that may have been sprayed.

Thanks again,

Mary Kay
p.s. I'm up to about 70 chickens. You? How are yours?

Re: interesting, wild plants

Posted: Sun Jan 18, 2009 2:16 pm
by millipede
mmm... I just love the smell of pine trees...

Re: interesting, wild plants

Posted: Tue Nov 15, 2011 7:50 pm
by marykays1
HUH? IDK what Michael Jackson has to do with this, LOL, but one thing, it brought me back to this forum, to which I haven't been in a few yrs. How the heck are you Millipede? Kelljonma, you still around? Still have chickens?

Back on topic, I've learned a lot more (but still lots to learn!) about wild edibles. I have been doing all kinds of wild greens except for mushrooms, as I don't know enough about them. How's everyone?

Mary Kay in Ohio

Re: interesting, wild plants

Posted: Wed Nov 16, 2011 6:58 am
by Nicki
marykays1 wrote:HUH? IDK what Michael Jackson has to do with this, LOL, but one thing, it brought me back to this forum, to which I haven't been in a few yrs. How the heck are you Millipede? Kelljonma, you still around? Still have chickens?

LOL I was wondering the same thing about what Michael Jackson had to do with this subject!! But hey, at least it did get you back on here!! :D

Re: interesting, wild plants

Posted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 3:55 pm
by millipede
HA... silly spammers. Glad to see you Mary Kay... it has been a while.

I just went back to the original post... you know, I still don't know what MOST of the plants in my yard are... including whatever it was I found that day. We do have a few interesting ones that smell good when cut, some when stepped on even. The only ones I usually nibble on are dandelions and wood sorrels, which look kind of like clover. We have the wild onion grasses all over but I haven't eaten many of them. Well, I guess blackberries would be considered a wild, edible plant so I guess I should count those as well as we have lots in our yard most years.
I REALLY want to learn more about wild plants but it gets overwhelming sometimes. There's just SO many it makes my head spin.

Re: interesting, wild plants

Posted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:05 am
by Nicki
I didn't know you grazed in your yard Milli LOL :P

And, I was kind of wondering if that guy was a spammer...guess so LOL

Re: interesting, wild plants

Posted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 11:08 am
by millipede
:p
It's hard to pass up free blackberries when they come around. We're hoping to have some other things eventually but that one grows wild quite easily. As for dandelions and other things, it's just a once in a while thing... though, it probably wouldn't hurt to eat them more often. I mean... free is nice... :)

Re: interesting, wild plants

Posted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 1:33 pm
by marykays1
Millipede, you can eat just about any thistle leaf. There are 200 diff't kinds of thistles and I mostly put them in my Vita-Mix and add to smoothies/juice. Even now in Nov, my garden gets some sort of thistle, which I allow to grow in the fall and ! One that looks like heart-shapped clover, which I call oxalis, and another that looks kind of like dandelion leaves.

Plantains are related to hostas, and did you know hosta leaves are edible? They're a little tough though, so cut into small pics and add to a salad. There are two kinds of plantains, broad-leaf, which are better for salads, eating, and then an English/narrow leaf. Best in the spring. More tender. If you're ever stung, you can find some plantain (I think the narrow one is better, but both work) chew it up and your enzymes mix with it to help aid you in your sting Put the spitty/slimy mix on the sting.. Cool huh.? Then it grows a long shoot-like flower. pull the little "balls" off of it, with your teeth and supposedly if you eat that three times a day, during mosquito season, they won't bite you. Doesnt taste bad, and is a relative of metamucil, so I guess it'll keep you regular.

Re the oxalis, it's called that because it is high in oxalates, so always combine all your greens with a vit c source...think putting lemon on a spinach salad ---so the vit c binds with the oxalic acid, and the oxalates don't bind up your minerals. so it's not good to eat too much oxalis, if indeed that is wood sorrel...I don't know though if it is!

HTH,

Mary Kay

Re: interesting, wild plants

Posted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 8:49 am
by millipede
I have a book with edible wild plants... I knew about plantains, thistles, and wood sorrels.
I've nibbled on the bods of the wood sorrels. I've never tried the plantains. I forget which kind it is that we have lots of. It's the shorter one. I can remember, even as a kid, picking them and peeling all the seeds off with my hands... just for fun. A few years back we had rabbits... they LOVED those.
I've never tried thistle. All those spines on them don't have me anxious to try them. Our yard is so weedy, we let things like that grow though. The thistles end up with lots of butterflies on them... and when they go to seed, we get gold finches nibbling on them. We LOVE being able to assist wildlife by letting those things grow.

I can't get over how our society is taught that we MUST have perfect lawns and that dandelions are BAD. What in the world are people thinking? Not only are they good for us... they're good for wildlife... AND, they're pretty. I love seeing a field of dandelions. But, the majority of people are spraying them with every chemical possible to get rid of them... all the while, you can BUY dandelion greens at health food stores. So messed up. I don't need to buy any as we have lots of them around. I think I ought to start eating more of them. They're not bad at all and we have some in the yard even this time of year.